Dia de los Muertos by Courtney Akinniyi

Today, on the second floor Gray Area in the Anderson University Center (AUC), the Diversity Center hosted a Mexican Cultural event known as Dia de los Muertos or Day of the Dead.
The event starts with a musical processional that is lead by Hong’s Resident Assistant Xochilt Coca.
Coca says, “I am happy that we had music it helped with crowd participation and we also are singing and celebrating the dead.”
The crowd of singers also has students from Hispanic Studies, Latinos Unidos, and other PLU community members who want to learn about an important Mexican event.
Dia de los Muertos is a day of celebration and observance for someone who was lost and comes from Mexican culture. This year’s celebration focused on women who continue to go missing and young children who die.
Diversity Advocate Isamar Henriquez explains the decorations. “The altar is filled with flowers because each kind means something. Especially, the marigolds. Those are for the children,” says Henriquez.
The altar is a huge arch filled with a beautiful arrangement of flowers. Underneath them are tables filled with photographs, rosaries, candles, little candies, and toys. Henriquez says that these things are all offerings to the spirit of the dead. It is important to try and invite them back with things that they loved so they can be among the living.
Hispanic Studies major, Jennie Grebb says, “I am glad that PLU has such an event to shed light on this beautiful ceremony. I also like the sugar bread.”
There are also activities during this event. Some people will opt for decorating sugar skulls with glitter glue and markers. Others will choose to read important facts about this Mexican tradition and eat sweet bread or drink hot cocoa.
This is PLU’s second year hosting this event. Next year the Diversity Center hopes for more people to come to this event. Diversity Advocate Isamar Henriquez estimates that 40 people came to the event.



Categories: Other

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